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HVM Graphene Conference Cambridge 2013 Programme Lineup!

HVMG13 Information | Bookings

Programme for 5 November 2013 HVMG Conference

 

Opening Session – Introduction & Graphene Basics: Functional Materials
10:00 Mike McCreary, Director, CIR Strategy
- Conference introduction
10:05 Professor Peter Dobson, Oxford University Nanomaterials – Chairman’s Introduction
10:20 Prof Andrea Ferrari, Cambridge University 
& Head, Cambridge Graphene Centre
Overview of the Applications of Graphene
10:35 Dr Patrick Frantz, CEO, Cambridge Graphene Platform
Low Cost Graphene & 2D Layered Material Inks for Printed Electronics
10:50 Dr Steve Thomas, CIT Ltd
Conductive materials – market uses & experiences
11:05 Panel with speakers & moderator & Prof Johnny Coleman Trinity College Dublin
11:30 Coffee break
Session 2 – Additive manufacturing, electronics, photonics
11:50 Dr Mike Banach, VP, Plastic Logic
Shaping the next industrial revolution
12:05 Dr David Brown, CTO, Canatu
Scaling of Carbon NanoBud film production for commercial apps in touch and display devices
12:20 Dr Richard van Rijn, CTO, Applied Nanolayers
High volume quality manufacture of graphene
12:30 Dr Kate Stone, Novalia
Creative printed electronics
12:35 Peter Towler, Director, BritonEMS part of OSI Electronics – What to expect from an EMS Supplier

12:40 Panel with Moderator Professor Ferrari & Dr Rob Harvey, AtomJet

13:05 Lunch and Exhibitions
Session 3 – Commercialisation Cases & other materials & applications
14:05 Dr Krzysztof Koziol, Chief Scientist, Cambridge Nanosystems Ltd
14:15 Professor Jonathan Coleman,
Layered materials: from tiny things to advanced applications
14:30 Professor Richard Palmer, Founder, Nanoscale Labs, Birmingham University
Prospects for massive scale-up from nano research in biochips & catalysis
14:50 Dr Nathan Hill, Strategy Director, National Graphene Institute – Commercialisation strategies

15:10 Panel with Moderator Del Stark CEO, Nanopro

15:30 Tea break
Final Session – Strategy for UK HVM & Graphene
16:00 Dr Jani Kivioja, Head, Nokia Research Center
Graphene – What is the commercial viability of short term applications?
16:30 Nick Coutts MA; Former IBM VP, CIR Strategy
Routes to Value for Graphene
16:40 Dr Martin Kemp, NanoKTN
Graphene commercialisation – Summary of industry consultation workshops
16:55 Professor Sir Michael Gregory CBE, Head, IfM
High Value Manufacturing Roadmaps
17:05 Panel with Professor Sir Mike Gregory CBE; Chairman’s Summary
17:30 Networking & Drinks Reception

Please contact 01223 303500 to speak to the organiser of HVMG13 directly.

 

Programme Lineup for Smart Homes 2013 Cambridge, 5 November

The 8th Smart Homes & Cleanpower Conference 2013 Expo (SHCP13 | Bookings) will take place at Buckingham House Conference Centre, Murray Edwards College, Cambridge University CB3 0DF on 5 November 2013, and the forum will discuss the above questions in pleasant and relaxed modern conference surrounds. An excellent lineup of speakers has been arrayed covering a unique range of related topics. Generalise & thrive!
Smart Homes Conference 2013 – 5 November Cambridge

Opening Session – Connected Intelligence, Water, Energy, Things
10:00 Justin Hayward, Director, CIR Strategy, Introduction
10:05 John Riley, Head, Digital Policy Alliance, Chairman’s Opening Remarks
10:10 Bryan Lawrence, Solutions Marketing Manager, ARM Ltd Lead Sponsor
Empowering your home: realizing efficiency, comfort and security
10:25 Robert Brunbäck, CMO, Telenor Connexion AB
The Smart Home: from Vision to Reality
10:40 Ian Ellerington, Head of Innovation, DECC
Energy Innovation Programme
10:55 Steve Kaye, Head of Innovation, Anglian Water, Gold Sponsors
Innovations in water
11:05 Panel with Chair, & Marco Pisano, ESCO, followed by coffee break
Session 2 – iWATER – Water Technologies
11:40 Linda Berkshire, Anglian Water
Water & customer experience
11:50 Laurie Reynolds, Director, Aquamatix
Connecting the Water Industry to the Internet of Things
12:00 Adam Burrows, I2O Water
Under Pressure: advanced management technologies
12:10 Marcus Fowler, Tynemarch
Hands to the pump: total control software
12:20 Paul Glass, Anglian Water
In-house displays & devices for water
12:30 Panel with Steve Kaye, Head of Innovation at Anglian Water
13:00 Rapid Innovation Pitches CIR Strategy & Venture Partners
13:10 Lunch and joint networking with HVM Graphene Stream
Session 3 – iHEAT – Homes Energy & Technology
14:00 Graeme Hodgson, Project Manager, Hitachi Europe, Gold Sponsors
Strategy for  Smart Communities
14:15 Andy Nowell, Technical Director, Sentec Ltd
Home Energy metering
14:30 Andy Heaton, CEO, EnModus Ltd
Connectivity in the smart home – Winner Takes All or Horses for Courses?
14:40 Russell Haggar, CEO, Xsilon Ltd – Dependable M2M & Case Hanadu
14:50 Chris Wright, Founder, Moixa Energy – Distributed systems: time shifting DC & lighting load
15:00 Panel with Graham Ford, Mansion Partners & Tea break
Final Session – Smart Homes & IoT Entrepreneurship
15:40 Adam Gould, CEO, ARM Sensinode
Introduction to IoT for Smart Homes
16:00 Amir Chaudhry, Founder, Nymote.org
Dumb homes, smart people: generational systems for IoT
16:10 Ben Kott, CEO, EnergyDeck Ltd
A Powerful platform to reduce energy cost
16:20 Usman Haque, Founder & CEO, Umbrellium Ltd
Empowering smart citizens
16:40 Pilgrim Beart, Founder Director, AlertMe
Smart Homes At Scale
17:00 Plenary panel with John Riley, Head of UK Gov Digital Policy Alliance, then Chair Summary
17:30 Networking Drinks

8th Smart Homes & Cleanpower Conference 2013 Expo (SHCP13 | Bookings)

Please call us on 01223 303500 for bookings or more information.

Graphene: what is the reality?

The HVM Conference Series was founded in 2002, after a market research report led to an early definition of high value manufacturing.

The HVM & Graphene Conference is anchored to the large end markets such as materials, electronics, photonics, energy and biotech and tries to connect these & related markets with graphenes & related functional materials, technologies & processes.

The HVM Conference will run an edition on Graphene (HVMG13) and related functional materials on 5 November 2013 in Cambridge. The Nobel Prize has been awarded in 2010 to Geim and Novoselov for work on Graphene. The conference is interested in commercial applications of the materials. There is no interest at this long-running & grounded UK conference series in hyping the market growth derived from the materials. The interest is in the uses, availability, manufacture, timing of graphene, related materials and their market growth. The wide range of potential applications below of graphene fits well with the range of processes & end-product markets that the HVM Conference has covered over the years, such as additive manufacture & printed electronics.

This conference of the brightest, best and most experienced will take on board the below, and ask & discuss the full suite of commercialisation & opportunity prioritisation questions. The conference is sponsored by the NanoKTN, Plastic Logic & OSI Electronics. There is also participation from Cambridge University, the IfM, Cambridge Graphene Centre, the National Graphene Institute, Manchester University, Oxford University, Birmingham University, Lancaster University, Imperial College, Cambridge Graphene Platform, Cambridge Nanosystems, Applied Nanolayers, CIT, Novalia, KPMG, Heraeus Noblelight, and a number of key commercial, larger players such as Nokia Research.

Here are some of the statements and comments made by academics at a selection of learned institutions in recent years:

Graphene is a sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb pattern, just a single atom thick. It could be a better semiconductor than silicon.
Stanford

 

Graphene is a material with outstanding properties that make it an excellent candidate for advanced applications in future electronics and photonics.

…graphene field-effect transistors, FETs, and …graphene monolithically integrated circuits (ICs). These graphene transistors and ICs could become essential elements in the blossoming fields of wireless communications, sensing, and imaging.

…impressive photonic properties of graphene. The light–graphene interaction can be adjusted using an electric field or chemical dopant, making graphene-based photonic devices tunable. (Applications such as)…fast photodetectors, optical modulators, far-infrared filters, polarizers, and electromagnetic wave shields. These graphene photonic devices could find various applications in optical communications, infrared imaging, and national security.

IBM Watson Research Center

 

Graphene is the thinnest known material in the universe and the strongest ever measured. Graphene can sustain current densities six orders of magnitude higher than that of copper…record thermal conductivity and stiffness, is impermeable to gases, and reconciles such conflicting qualities as brittleness and ductility.

Manchester

 

Recent discoveries have provided simple methods for preparing lab-scale samples to study graphene. A number of techniques have emerged that show promise for producing large-scale samples with the ultimate goal of developing devices that take advantage of graphene’s unusual properties. As large samples become available, the possibility grows for applications of this material in solar cell technology (as flexible, transparent electrodes), in composites material development, and in electronic devices.

Columbia

 

…those properties (of graphene/graphene oxides) can be exploited in several applications such as photo-catalysts (degradation of pollutants)…

Nokia Research

 

(We study) thermal transport properties of graphene…applications of controlling heat at nanoscale.

The thermal conductivity can be tuned dramatically by the graphene filler concentration.

Graphene-based composites are potentially promising as thermal interface materials (for) modern heat management in many industrial applications.

Purdue

 

The HVM Graphene 2013 Conference is co-located with the ARM sponsored Smart Homes & Cleanpower 2013 Conference, in its 8th year, which takes in Heat, Water and Connected devices/IoT Sessions for an excellent set of crossovers around energy, heat, storage, electronics, and data. Delegates of  one conference may move freely between both conference rooms for a rich, inspiring and productive experience on the day.

To attend HVM Graphene 2013, simply email (graphene@hvm-uk.com) with your name, affiliation & contact details, and the organisers will do the necessary (pricing is on the webpage linked above).

This blog entry was researched and compiled by Dr Justin Hayward MBA and Conference Director.

iHEAT Conference enabled optimal intelligent heating system

Plenty of “small fry” aka exciting startups and SMEs made up the programme for the first HEAT conference focusing on intelligent heating systems in Cambridge in November 2012. Companies expert in accumulator tanks, heat metering, control systems and intelligent automation joined to provide the basis for liberating the householder from the worry of reducing their heating bill & carbon as best they can.

Summary slides and images | Conference Home | CIR Event Registration

The problem of reducing the heating bill & carbon as best one can is initially supported across the board by the ingenuity of ARM’s engineers who design chips that minimise the energy used by sensors and control systems and do so with maximal utility and intelligence.

ARM sponsored the conferences iHEAT and iWATER in November 2012 and spoke of the idea of partnership driving innovation in energy efficiency. Keith Clarke of ARM mentioned OECD forecasts of a very different world in the medium term of 20 years’ horizon, where the middle class, living much as most do in the UK and “West” live now, will increase globally by 3 billion people! The same source suggests an increase in energy usage of 60% to 2030, something which BPAE’s Katrina Landis has highlighted at CIR Events before. ARM also noted that 18 countries are estimated to see a water shortage in the next 13 years to 2025.

With this backdrop, there are huge opportunities and indeed imperatives for efficiency and innovative solutions in data and services for the sectors of consumer products & systems, infrastructure, transport, power generation and industry and transmission.

For ARM, intelligence is emerging everywhere – in cars, homes, smart devices – even street lighting. ARM calls this the Architecture of the Digital World.

There is a “connectivity gap” which ARM hopes to help solve, where one has long communications distances, short battery life and very high cost – moving this to shorter distances, long life and low cost.

ARM also believes in and supports an internet of things architecture (see the iotaforum.com site) rather than an internet of silos (the higher “entropy” result of organic growth).

Galu Accumulator Tanks spoke after ARM plc as an up and coming startup manufacturing products that will be a key pivot in the move towards optimal cost, carbon and convenience home heating and energy systems.

The important departure from the typical British home is that the hot water storage tank is no longer a small copper tin with something akin to zip-up pyjamas as insulation, and which goes cold overnight. It is now a larger, highly-insulated store, which loses only a degree centigrade overnight and thereby opens up the possibility of storing the resultant energy until needed.

We can also combine energy sources such as biomass boilers, solar thermal panels, heat pumps, with mains gas. Once there are choices of inputs, we have another fundamental shift; now, one can choose which source to use as input energy source and at what time. And with a stratified tank, one can choose which section of the accumulator tank to withdraw energy from. An analogy was given of “pennies and pounds” that one may need to take from the tank depending on the temperature required.

This is actually quite revolutionary (although ancient and indigenous peoples have for millenia used such optimisation techniques).

Furthermore, we have the problem of convenience and human effort. Most people do not have the time or interest to manually run their heating systems. They do so because they have had to. By introducing sensors inside and out, we can gather a lot of ambient information. Then through control systems and intelligent learning, one can reduce to negligible levels, the human effort to run the system optimally. Running it optimally is crucial. Theoretically, one can obtain the best possible efficiency without human input other than the information obtained about the human occupants in the general running of their households. Specifically, human interaction with the system can be reduced to adjustment of temperature of rooms to comfort – the simplest possible choice, leave alone, warmer or cooler. This minimal interaction is sufficient for an intelligent system to learn how to run the heating system according to the occupants normal patterns of behaviour and needs and wants.

Heat pumps, solar thermal, and mains gas require little maintenance by the holseholders as they are “on tap”. The case of biomass (logs or pellets) clearly has a feeding system that is limited by the store of biomass that can be held or stored, but this process can be almost seasonal only for larger systems.

The system can be set to optimise for cost and then carbon, which might be the “default”, or vice versa, or indeed only for one or other factor.

The remainder of the conference was devoted to systems that can achieve this ideal heating system based on efficient thermal storage and multiple input sources.

One such provider had an in-home M2M (machine-to-machine) technology that is scaleable and such that one can avoid the internet of silos. It is an enabling technology.

Another company, New Era Controls, had a system for industrial and commercial property energy management.

A third company, Your Smart Home, through technical director, Will Hopkins, gave the stark contrast between the modern car and the modern home. The car has a range of intelligent features, such as automatic lights, zoned heating controls, heated seats, dimming, satnav, adaptive occupancy settings and so on. The house by contrast has a wiring system based on 1950s technology, no zoning, energy management, sensing, integration and so on. It seemed a huge and glaring opportunity!

Some insight into why this smart home automation for heating hasn’t already happened came from the final session opening talk based on research by the government’s cabinet office.

One-off, conscious, deliberative “decision making” such as buying an energy efficient home or improving the energy efficiency of ones home was contrasted with habitual purchasing decisions, or everyday behaviours which are automatic, non-conscious habits like reducing everyday energy consumption in the home.

The smart heating trial showed that “making it easy” was crucial. Incidentally, this agrees entirely with CIR Strategy’s work on routes to market whereby one designs the service around removing the key barriers to purchase and use of the product or service. In this case, the cabinet office speaker gave the example fo the loft clearance service, which made take up of loft insulation much more rapid than simply reducing cost through group discounts, which made little difference to take up.

DECC’s speaker noted that “daily heat storage can help to improve the performance and consumer acceptability of heat pumps, which are less able to meet spikes in heat demand than the incumbent gas boiler technology.”

DECC added that: “heat storage can help make heat networks more economical by allowing heat sources to operate more efficiently, reducing the amount of heat generated on capacity to meet peak demand.”

This shows the high importance of thermal storage and accumulation of heat, and that this is supported strongly by government is clear in its strategy of March 2012, as well as in numerous prior documents.

AlertMe’s Founder Pilgrim Beart stated that “1⁄4  of  all UK energy  goes on Home Heating & Hot  water.” Pilgrim noted that we have warmer houses – up to an average of 18C from 12C in 1970, not as a result of climate change or of turning up the thermostat, but from heating more rooms within the house and for longer. Yes, consumption of energy has risen, though more modestly than the temperature, as a result of efficiencies.

According to BERR, though, 10 million of our 26 million homes do not have a thermostat! And almost no-one has visibility on the cost changes as well as the temperature changes we make. Beart stated also that temperature was not the same as comfort: one can feel warm when it is cooler, and cold when it is hotter!

Of those homes that have thermostats, many of them are old-style, that act like simple “switches”  – turn up and on when cold. Some are “modern” thermostats which are programmable like old VCRs, and which defeat 47% of the people who have them, according to research by YouGov.

And some have “cloud thermostats” on their smart phones which give home heating control anywhere, anytime.

AlertMe noted that stakeholder views are quite different, with industry looking for unique, value-added services & upsell, smart meters & TOU billing systems, while consumers look for lower cost, peace of mind, control, simplicity, comfort and convenience.

“In an extendible,  intelligent heating system”, said Beart, “the most common action is of course to ignore the system and leave it alone. Such a system, as described in the conference piece by piece, will improve efficiency, be simpler to use and yield better comfort.”

Finally, Fiona Saunders, Head of Investment at British Gas, gave a talk covering smart metering, remote  heating control and the Customer-Led Network Revolution (CLNR). Fiona highlighted positive reactions from more than half of those customers surveyed who have smart meters. British Gas have installed 400k smart meters to end 2011. BG see intelligent heating systems as a longer term, strategic area of interest, enabling customers to reduce bills, live more comfortably, while building their own business around better cheaper technologies.

Remote heating controls were discussed, which the user controls from a smart device or a laptop. Such a control “resonated” with customers, a great majority of which said that saving money, increasing control and comfort were important to them.

Finally, BG said that there had been propositions taken up by customers on time-of-use pricing (3 levels); heat pumps with larger thermal stores; and routing excess PV to hot water rather than into the smart grid.

Please call 01223 303500 if  you wish to get involved in future CIR events, in cleantech or high value manufacturing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iHeat, iWater, iWaste: all together now!

The HEAT Conference has been running since 2007 annually and you can join it via here. Each year it has covered a different set of topics within home energy technologies, including solar PV, lighting, passivhaus & MMC. This year is the exciting turn of iHEAT or intelligent heating systems for smart home/building automation.

The aim of this private-sector led conference, which is sponsored by global chip designer ARM Holdings plc, MNC Schneider Electric, fast-track SME AlertMe Ltd and startup accumulator tank company Galu Ltd, is to show how to optimise and automate heating so that consumers who have shown themselves to be less than engaged with esoteric dials and displays, can now live their normal lifestyles in the safe knowledge that they are spending as little as possible on heating, and emitting the least possible carbon for that lifestyle. What could be simpler and more to the point?

So come to Cambridge University, CB3 0DF, on 13 November at 09:30 to see how this is done! With 6 years of successful gatherings under this heading, and a clear and coherent aim for the 2012 edition of iHEAT, it is a conference to enjoy and relish.

What is more is that this year, in order to complete this cleantech series that began in 2007, there will be a separate conference, led inter alia by Anglian Water, WIN and UKWIR, called iWater & iWaste 2012. Registration is at the same site here, as iHEAT above. As these names suggest, the topics will cover core cleantech areas of how new water technologies and product innovations can help enable water utility buyers to improve their services to consumers and businesses.

Led by Anglian Water, half of the day will be devoted to another related core cleantech issue of waste-as-resource. Waste-to-energy (W2E) or energy from waste (EfW) will be covered in one session, another will look into more general closing of loops, reuse and resource efficiency, and how profits can be made in so doing. A final panel will look at how the sectors of water, waste and energy can learn from each other in coming up with significant and infrastructural level change. Examples could be the application of communications standards from electrical metering systems to gas and water, new types of gas being directed into the grid, and industrial symbiosis.

Networking between the two conferences will be joint, with a combined exhibition and buffet lunch.

The date for the iHEAT, iWATER and iWASTE Conferences is 13 November 2012 at Cambridge Universiry CB3 0DF. Book now for the conference at www.cir-strategy.com/events/register or you can book at 01223 303500.

 

 

Join the High Value Manufacturing Conference 10th Anniversary

How time flies! That’s almost 10 years since the inaugural HVM Conference in 2002. This year the date for the 10th Anniversary HVM Conference is 14 November, organised by CIR Strategy, the Cambridge-based strategy consultancy. With an all keynote lineup, this year’s decade anniversary festivities promise to be super. But what will be talked about at the celebration of this 10 birthday?

It will be an opportunity for private sector companies to discuss their strategy alongside other private sector companies and supply chain companies offering routes to market for products, and experts & service providers whose companies can add value. An ideal mix!

Cambridge has punched well above its weight in technology and innovation, with a cluster of over 800 genuine innovators, and this is mirrored in High Value Manufacturing. HVM is the present and the future of industry in the UK. HVM companies can make and market difficult-to-make, well-designed, IPR-rich products to global markets, scale quickly, reinvest in their own product development pipeline and spawn new emergent industries.

This is why this conference came into being 10 years ago, with a meeting bringing together such companies as Plastic Logic, CDT, Xaar, and Inca Digital. While the share of services in our economy has continued to rise to around 87%, the value of manufacturing as an anchor to the economy has grown, and its presence enables some of the services businesses that are created.

On 14 November, HVM companies young and old will come together and we’ll discuss segments such as printed electronics, 3D deposition, electronics & sensors, regenerative medecine, nanomaterials, chemicals, nuclear, and core manufacturing needs such as CNC, precision forging, sheet forming, folding and so on.

The 100-strong director level group will discuss trends and drivers, R&D, the economy, investment, government influence & limitations, competitiveness, competencies, processes & products, servitisation, growth strategies and several case studies.

What does UK HVM landscape look like now? What will UK HVM look like in the future? Who are the key private sector players: large and SME companies and investors and channels to market? How has success been achieved by some? What are the barriers to growing HVM companies in the UK?

“I’m very proud of our modest influence on our UK manufacturing segment in terms of high level discussions and reporting during the last decade.” said Justin Hayward, Consultant and Conference Director. “It seems to me that there are great opportunities for those who dare.”

The speaking and panel lineup for the day is building rapidly now and includes

Chair for day: Professor Sir Mike Gregory CBE
Speakers:
Nick Clegg, Deputy Prime Minister (invited)
Indro Mukherjee, CEO Plastic Logic
Ray Southam, CEO Tonejet

Phil O’Donovan, Founder Cambridge Silicon Radio plc

Billy Boyle, Founder Owlstone Technologies
Richard Archer, former CEO TAP Biosystems
Tony Abri, MD, BritonEMS
Nathan Hill, Qi3 Accelerator
Will Barton, TSB Lead HVM
Dick Elsy, CEO HVM Catapult tbc
Nigel Brown OBE, IQ Capital
Sir Michael Marshall CBE, Owner, Marshall Group
Panel: Lord Sainsbury of Turville, Chancellor Cambridge University, Former Minister Innovation, Matthew Bullock, Former CEO NPBS