Category Archives: Uncategorized

Graphene Technology and Business is Here

venue_fe2

Introduction

The event set was billed as the Cambridge Graphene Technology Days 2015 (with a hashtag of #CGD15), with no fewer than six events taking place. The first day saw second CIR Graphene & GRMs masterclass, which was attended by 30 senior corporate executives at the West Cambridge Site, while in parallel a graphene technology showcase day ran, with internal CGC partner meetings held by the Cambridge Graphene Centre.
Within this showcase the CGC partners’ technologies and CIR exhibitors were arrayed together for a very exciting press event with the director of CGC on stage with the University of Cambridge Vice Chancellor Professor Leszek Borysiewicz FRS and the head of Engineering.
In the evening there was a dinner at Madingley Hall led by CGC for invited partners and for those who had attended the 2nd CIR Graphene Masterclass and were arriving to attend 3rd CIR Business Conference the following day. 80 delegates attended the dinner, around half each from CGC and CIR.
The third CIR Graphene Business Conference for 100 businesspeople was held on the second day. This followed an inaugural series of events, including the CIR Graphene business conference (which was also held in Cambridge, in November 2013), and other CIR Graphene events in May 2014 and February 2015. An excellent audience of delegates enjoyed entertaining presentations on stage, as well as four panel question-and-answer sessions, and networking opportunities at the exhibition space, where around 40 companies were on show.
There were 20 talks throughout the day, from academics, dignitaries, large MNC business leaders in space, defence, oil and gas and steel, and scale-up materials solutions providers like Haydale and FlexEnable, and later interesting talks from venture capitalists, economists and intellectual property firms. Speakers were highly praised in feedback surveys of attending delegates by CIR.
2nd CIR Graphene Masterclass
During the masterclass, the application projects of large firms and scale-ups were discussed among 30 graphene senior corporate executives with CIR Leader Nick Coutts and colleagues in the context of value network analysis and ‘Routes to Value’. This latter is a rigorous strategic method being used by large companies to ensure that projects are within a process that connects them explicitly with the objective and values of the business (including culture) as constraints. This pioneering method that could help with scale-up gaps, enable large companies to bring in graphene material enhancements and services to add enormous value to the development of application markets.
Dr Justin Hayward, Director of CIR, said: “I am delighted that Cambridge Investment Research was able to organise complementary events within the Cambridge Graphene Tech Days 2015 event-set alongside the Cambridge Graphene Centre at this special time for the centre and for graphene, in particular, providing a highly business-focused aspect.
Sessions at 3rd CIR Graphene Business Conference
In the first session on 6 November, the director of the Cambridge Graphene Centre argued that graphene is the future of communication and will become better than silicon by 2024. The vision here is to integrate modulators and photo-detector with graphene. A transceiver prototype with graphene will solve the problem of heat that is insoluble to Moore’s Law for data storage and transmissions with current materials.
Following this, the Rt Hon the Lord Alec Broers asked whether graphene is the biggest achievement of the 21st century – comparing it with other areas on the USA’s ‘Grand Challenges’ list, including: solar technology; fusion energy; carbon sequestration; solve nitrogen cycle (whereby the pollution issue here is seen by many as more tangible and urgent than global warming issues); clean water; restoring urban infrastructure; engineering better medicine; enhancing virtual reality (flexible and wearable electronics); preventing nuclear catastrophes; secure cyber space; personalised learning; and revere engineering the human brain.
The next presentation, by IfM’s Professor William O’Neill focused on ‘manufacturing landscape and drive for impact’, in which he argued that there is a manufacturing economy in the UK, and, moreover, that UK manufacturing is high value manufacturing.
O’Neill also revealed that 85% of R&D finance in the UK comes from manufacturing companies, but that there is a missing connection between lab R&D and alpha level production technologies with large scale manufacturing. Furthermore, he added, while the UK government invests a lot in R&D, thereby creating great research, “this is just an expense, and we need to add value by delivering technologies through companies.
The Keynote speech by Haydale’s CEO, Ray Gibbs, argued that the current market analysis on graphene is wrong and is very hard to predict. He also discussed the significant market for composites, as well as the large markets for Graphene materials, but these, he said, are mostly conservative and highly regulated. He therefore underlined the need to instead to look (at least initially) to the currently unregulated markets: boats, wind energy, pipes, and rails.
Industrial challenges.

venue_haydale
For Ray Gibbs, the industrial challenge lies in proving production is repeatable, consistent and cost effective, and he called for immediate and better standardisation so as to create “consistent quality and value; and a price good for stakeholders.”

The next Keynote speech, delivered by focused on issues in the aerospace and defence sectors, with the lifecycle costs being highlighted as a particular area for consideration, as well as areas such as fuel consumption, graphene’s anisotropy, (channelling heat, heat dissipation & spreading), graphene’s use in a fusion power cell which could be a solution for completely silent electric airplanes, as well as an underlining of the importance of reliability and safety and certification.

This presentation posited the following as the main issues and R&D directions for aeroplanes: propellers in rotors, energy storage, structures, shielding (objects, RPG, radars, lighting, etc.), optics (lasers, receivers, lenses, and mirrors), displays (wearable electronics, flexible electronics), and ice prevention and de-icing.

Concerning satellites, the main issues and R&D directions were revealed to be: solar arrays (there is a lot of solar radiations to harness; PV cover glass could be made thinner and lighter using graphene), multilayer insulation (thermal shield), structures, antenna and mechanisms (higher conductivity needs), shielding, and optics (laser communications).

During the second session, speakers from a large global industrialist firm delivered a further keynote on graphene applications on steel for energy storage, an important area due to the fact that corrosion is a significant problem for steel, a material which can enable a large-scale implementation of energy storage tech.

The speakers outlined the applications of steel in energy storage thus: building integrated PVs (functioning coatings on steel for buildings, which are active, capture and then store thermal energy in phase material); batteries (electroplated steel cans, electrodes and casing); fuel cells (usually gold plated stainless steel bipolar plates but should be made cheaper, possibly with graphene); and supercapacitors (mostly aluminium and copper but steel for casing).

They then turned their attention to the performance improvement required for steel: good, electrical conductivity; electrochemical stability (corrosion prevention); thermal conductivity (high power devices); and formability and strength – tribology.

Regarding the replacement of gold for coating in LC steel, it was argued that the industrial challenges include scaling up – e.g. pilot line roll to roll to large scale, scale graphene coatings to cover that in which the steel industry operates, which is enormous; and the ability to coat millions of square metres with tonnes of the material with speeds of up to 100m/min – this, they said, would save billions by fighting corrosion

The presentation by Nanocarbon asked why it is better to do Graphene transfer in the lab instead of involving third parties, and posited the following reasons: it is safer (there is no need to share details of applications), it is faster (full control), it is cleaner (full control, no carriers issues), it is cheaper, and you learn and optimise.

Cambridge Nanosystem’s presentation explored the transformation of methane into graphene powder, as well as atmospheric plasma to break difficult and stable molecules like methane, CO2 and other carbon-based molecules. Hydrogen is produced as a byproduct of this process undertaken to create graphene powder, explained Dr Krysztof Koziol, which also has uses.

Revolution

The third session included a speech by Novalia’s Dr Kate Stone, who discussed adding interactivity to print and how paper with interactive surfaces could revolutionise the digital world, while OCSiAl’s Will Riches discussed an industrial scale facility for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), focusing in on touch screens, paint and coatings, lithium battery, and polymer composites.

Dr Gun-Soo Kim from Standard Graphene (which emerged from Samsung), then spoke about how graphene flakes stand to lead the market, before a keynote speech by FlexEnable’s Dr Paul Cain discussed ‘bringing any surface to life’ – from those which are wearable to those found in the automotive sector.

The fourth session included a focus on the intellectual property landscape with regard to graphene by Marks & Clerk’s Mash-Hud Iqbal, who described patent families globally by geography and sector and over time to 2014. Later, BP’s Sheetal Handa delivered a keynote address on the challenges in the oil and gas industry, focusing on sub-sea extraction and the various materials needed, as well as oil pipe transportation and problems with the various materials (sand, oil, water, condensation, and welding) that are in the pipes (i.e. surface interactions), and the idea that applications for 2D materials will mostly be in corrosion resistance, surface treatments, deposits and fouling, self-repairing systems, and separations.

Indeed, according to Handa, nanomaterials in (titanium based) lubricant oil result in 40% less friction, and because the pipelines used are extremely long (thousands of kilometres), are located in remote, hot/cold conditions, have several phases of material pass in great volumes, and produce large amounts of unwanted material and erosion etc., less friction is a necessity.

Handa revealed that, for BP, 2D materials have numerous positive uses, including: corrosion resistance, surface treatment, deposits & fouling, self-indicate damage, and against bio films formations in pipes, low wear friction, and offshore pipe work.

Handa concluded that BP is now working to develop sensing technologies to help solve the mystery of why composites fail in order to facilitate a wider roll-out of these materials.

The event was thus a success, with a wide variety of stakeholders coming together to share their views on both the uses and limitations (and only by highlighting these can we hope to overcome them) with regard to graphene and other 2D materials.

For more information about the next conference and executive briefing with master class in this programme please see: www.hvm-uk.com. Delegates who have attended earlier graphene festival events are offered discounts.

 

The Value of the Smart Systems Summit 2014 1-2 October London IoD

sss-masthead2

This is a special summit culminating 7 years of smart systems conferences within various segments

We form media partnerships with those who can extend our reach further

We are a strategy consultancy rather than an event organiser following instructions

We specialise in market research, using contact referrals and social media to obtain top speakers year after year

The value is in the bringing together of industry leaders beyond your own lists, with government and other academic groups

Our databases are large, from 12 years of conferences with 3,200 delegates

Network with industry innovators to create and develop critical new business collaborations and to exchange knowledge

Minimize risk by keeping up with technology developments – where is the industry going

Bring in cross-over engineering situations that might lend valuable ideas to work already being done

The spice of high level events in the capital, a greater chance of serendipity in networking

We’re bringing together top people from no fewer than 21 conferences in Cambridge and Oxford on these topics – so it’ll be a unique group, not the same people

If communications are important to you, this will be a well-covered conference in social media and in print

It will quickly generate a legacy website and slides for the site Slideshare, which are looked at by delegates and referred to others over time, something which builds over a long period

Gain industry recognition for yourself and your company through speaking, roundtable participation

For buyers – what new systems, products and services are there to buy?

It’s a prestigious venue – one of the best in the UK

It’s in a central location easy to reach from all directions –  In the capital, in exciting West London, near parliament.

Book now via this link

This is how hard it is to get it right…

Ramanujan, the self-taught Indian mathematician, is being celebrated this year. Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel (Slumdog millionaire) star in a film being made in Cambridge as I write, summer 2014.  Another film about his life has just been completed.

Ramanujan wrote down, worked on, and arrived at thousands of results, the vast majority of which were correct. He came to Cambridge for five years towards the end of his short life and became a Fellow of the Royal Society. Born in Madras in 1887, he died there of TB in 1920, aged 32.

This little anecdote below, however, from the 1940 book “Ramanujan” by Professor G Hardy (Chapters I and II), who helped bring Ramanujan to Cambridge, shows how hard it is to get it right in mathematics.

In the theory of prime numbers, there was a ‘prime number theorem’ for the number of primes up to a given number, call it x, which, brilliantly, Ramanujan independently rediscovered. Gauss, Legendre and Dirichlet had “endorsed” it prior. The theorem however “errs by defect” – which means if you stress test it enough, i.e. go to high enough examples, you’ll see it deviate from the truth, and increasingly so.

Up to x = 1 billion, the expression is good!

But another mathematician, Littlewood, went on in 1912 to show that there are an infinite number of (very high) values of x where the formula is shown to be incorrect. He did so by looking at its difference from a better, proven formula for the number of primes up to a given value, and an example found by a man called Skewes was 10 to the power of ten to the power of ten to the power 34. A large number! Hardy thought this was the “largest number ever to have served a definite purpose in mathematics”.

When Einstein wrote down Special and General Relativity and these were later tested, this showed that under certain conditions (strong gravitational fields or velocities close to the speed of light) the Newtonian theory was very wrong. Quantum mechanics does the same thing at the small scale to Newton’s theories.

A conjecture, a model, a hypothesis remains just that until you prove it, as in mathematics, e.g. prime numbers,  or do experiments to check it, as in gravitation, or in small-scale physics.

Proof is extremely difficult.

Smart X: Exponential new experiences via the industrial internet

Smart X is taking off in a big way, according to the Chairman of the Smart Homes Conference 2013 which took place in Cambridge Q4.

But there are risks of great inefficiency and impediment to the evolution of the industrial internet because the technology or innovation is often still built within a silo, incompatible from hardware or software or data sharing with other innovations.

This is a potential barrier to maximally speedy development and is likely in part to be due to the use of business models attempting to appropriate value to investors and entrepreneurs having this effect.

ARM, the Lead Sponsor of the 2013 conference, therefore noted that we should be looking for business models and strategies to make money from Smart X such that are open and enable rapid development and crossovers.

Interoperability of devices will be important,  while data needs to kept secure. Innovation needs to be driven by diversity.

Telenor stated that the 10 billion smart home devices currently, would go to 50 billion by 2020. They noted that the value of a network grows rapidly with the number of connected devices, but more also with the effective use of the data shared.

This year Cambridge Investment Research combines its Smart Series conferences under the banner Smart X. We will return to interoperability. We will look careful at monetisation and business models. More to be announced!

We look to X = Grids and Energy 3-4 June in Cambridge. Then we move to other cities. There is also a related industrial conference series called HVM, which this year focused on carbon-based functional materials such as graphene, diamonds, carbon black and nanotubes.

These event series each have great potential and together it is exponential!

We look forward potentially to greeting you in person at one of these sensational events, hopefully starting this summer in Cambridge.

Watch this space!

 

 

 

 

HVM Graphene Conference Cambridge 2013 Programme Lineup!

HVMG13 Information | Bookings

Programme for 5 November 2013 HVMG Conference

 

Opening Session – Introduction & Graphene Basics: Functional Materials
10:00 Mike McCreary, Director, CIR Strategy
- Conference introduction
10:05 Professor Peter Dobson, Oxford University Nanomaterials – Chairman’s Introduction
10:20 Prof Andrea Ferrari, Cambridge University 
& Head, Cambridge Graphene Centre
Overview of the Applications of Graphene
10:35 Dr Patrick Frantz, CEO, Cambridge Graphene Platform
Low Cost Graphene & 2D Layered Material Inks for Printed Electronics
10:50 Dr Steve Thomas, CIT Ltd
Conductive materials – market uses & experiences
11:05 Panel with speakers & moderator & Prof Johnny Coleman Trinity College Dublin
11:30 Coffee break
Session 2 – Additive manufacturing, electronics, photonics
11:50 Dr Mike Banach, VP, Plastic Logic
Shaping the next industrial revolution
12:05 Dr David Brown, CTO, Canatu
Scaling of Carbon NanoBud film production for commercial apps in touch and display devices
12:20 Dr Richard van Rijn, CTO, Applied Nanolayers
High volume quality manufacture of graphene
12:30 Dr Kate Stone, Novalia
Creative printed electronics
12:35 Peter Towler, Director, BritonEMS part of OSI Electronics – What to expect from an EMS Supplier

12:40 Panel with Moderator Professor Ferrari & Dr Rob Harvey, AtomJet

13:05 Lunch and Exhibitions
Session 3 – Commercialisation Cases & other materials & applications
14:05 Dr Krzysztof Koziol, Chief Scientist, Cambridge Nanosystems Ltd
14:15 Professor Jonathan Coleman,
Layered materials: from tiny things to advanced applications
14:30 Professor Richard Palmer, Founder, Nanoscale Labs, Birmingham University
Prospects for massive scale-up from nano research in biochips & catalysis
14:50 Dr Nathan Hill, Strategy Director, National Graphene Institute – Commercialisation strategies

15:10 Panel with Moderator Del Stark CEO, Nanopro

15:30 Tea break
Final Session – Strategy for UK HVM & Graphene
16:00 Dr Jani Kivioja, Head, Nokia Research Center
Graphene – What is the commercial viability of short term applications?
16:30 Nick Coutts MA; Former IBM VP, CIR Strategy
Routes to Value for Graphene
16:40 Dr Martin Kemp, NanoKTN
Graphene commercialisation – Summary of industry consultation workshops
16:55 Professor Sir Michael Gregory CBE, Head, IfM
High Value Manufacturing Roadmaps
17:05 Panel with Professor Sir Mike Gregory CBE; Chairman’s Summary
17:30 Networking & Drinks Reception

Please contact 01223 303500 to speak to the organiser of HVMG13 directly.

 

Programme Lineup for Smart Homes 2013 Cambridge, 5 November

The 8th Smart Homes & Cleanpower Conference 2013 Expo (SHCP13 | Bookings) will take place at Buckingham House Conference Centre, Murray Edwards College, Cambridge University CB3 0DF on 5 November 2013, and the forum will discuss the above questions in pleasant and relaxed modern conference surrounds. An excellent lineup of speakers has been arrayed covering a unique range of related topics. Generalise & thrive!
Smart Homes Conference 2013 – 5 November Cambridge

Opening Session – Connected Intelligence, Water, Energy, Things
10:00 Justin Hayward, Director, CIR Strategy, Introduction
10:05 John Riley, Head, Digital Policy Alliance, Chairman’s Opening Remarks
10:10 Bryan Lawrence, Solutions Marketing Manager, ARM Ltd Lead Sponsor
Empowering your home: realizing efficiency, comfort and security
10:25 Robert Brunbäck, CMO, Telenor Connexion AB
The Smart Home: from Vision to Reality
10:40 Ian Ellerington, Head of Innovation, DECC
Energy Innovation Programme
10:55 Steve Kaye, Head of Innovation, Anglian Water, Gold Sponsors
Innovations in water
11:05 Panel with Chair, & Marco Pisano, ESCO, followed by coffee break
Session 2 – iWATER – Water Technologies
11:40 Linda Berkshire, Anglian Water
Water & customer experience
11:50 Laurie Reynolds, Director, Aquamatix
Connecting the Water Industry to the Internet of Things
12:00 Adam Burrows, I2O Water
Under Pressure: advanced management technologies
12:10 Marcus Fowler, Tynemarch
Hands to the pump: total control software
12:20 Paul Glass, Anglian Water
In-house displays & devices for water
12:30 Panel with Steve Kaye, Head of Innovation at Anglian Water
13:00 Rapid Innovation Pitches CIR Strategy & Venture Partners
13:10 Lunch and joint networking with HVM Graphene Stream
Session 3 – iHEAT – Homes Energy & Technology
14:00 Graeme Hodgson, Project Manager, Hitachi Europe, Gold Sponsors
Strategy for  Smart Communities
14:15 Andy Nowell, Technical Director, Sentec Ltd
Home Energy metering
14:30 Andy Heaton, CEO, EnModus Ltd
Connectivity in the smart home – Winner Takes All or Horses for Courses?
14:40 Russell Haggar, CEO, Xsilon Ltd – Dependable M2M & Case Hanadu
14:50 Chris Wright, Founder, Moixa Energy – Distributed systems: time shifting DC & lighting load
15:00 Panel with Graham Ford, Mansion Partners & Tea break
Final Session – Smart Homes & IoT Entrepreneurship
15:40 Adam Gould, CEO, ARM Sensinode
Introduction to IoT for Smart Homes
16:00 Amir Chaudhry, Founder, Nymote.org
Dumb homes, smart people: generational systems for IoT
16:10 Ben Kott, CEO, EnergyDeck Ltd
A Powerful platform to reduce energy cost
16:20 Usman Haque, Founder & CEO, Umbrellium Ltd
Empowering smart citizens
16:40 Pilgrim Beart, Founder Director, AlertMe
Smart Homes At Scale
17:00 Plenary panel with John Riley, Head of UK Gov Digital Policy Alliance, then Chair Summary
17:30 Networking Drinks

8th Smart Homes & Cleanpower Conference 2013 Expo (SHCP13 | Bookings)

Please call us on 01223 303500 for bookings or more information.

Graphene: what is the reality?

The HVM Conference Series was founded in 2002, after a market research report led to an early definition of high value manufacturing.

The HVM & Graphene Conference is anchored to the large end markets such as materials, electronics, photonics, energy and biotech and tries to connect these & related markets with graphenes & related functional materials, technologies & processes.

The HVM Conference will run an edition on Graphene (HVMG13) and related functional materials on 5 November 2013 in Cambridge. The Nobel Prize has been awarded in 2010 to Geim and Novoselov for work on Graphene. The conference is interested in commercial applications of the materials. There is no interest at this long-running & grounded UK conference series in hyping the market growth derived from the materials. The interest is in the uses, availability, manufacture, timing of graphene, related materials and their market growth. The wide range of potential applications below of graphene fits well with the range of processes & end-product markets that the HVM Conference has covered over the years, such as additive manufacture & printed electronics.

This conference of the brightest, best and most experienced will take on board the below, and ask & discuss the full suite of commercialisation & opportunity prioritisation questions. The conference is sponsored by the NanoKTN, Plastic Logic & OSI Electronics. There is also participation from Cambridge University, the IfM, Cambridge Graphene Centre, the National Graphene Institute, Manchester University, Oxford University, Birmingham University, Lancaster University, Imperial College, Cambridge Graphene Platform, Cambridge Nanosystems, Applied Nanolayers, CIT, Novalia, KPMG, Heraeus Noblelight, and a number of key commercial, larger players such as Nokia Research.

Here are some of the statements and comments made by academics at a selection of learned institutions in recent years:

Graphene is a sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb pattern, just a single atom thick. It could be a better semiconductor than silicon.
Stanford

 

Graphene is a material with outstanding properties that make it an excellent candidate for advanced applications in future electronics and photonics.

…graphene field-effect transistors, FETs, and …graphene monolithically integrated circuits (ICs). These graphene transistors and ICs could become essential elements in the blossoming fields of wireless communications, sensing, and imaging.

…impressive photonic properties of graphene. The light–graphene interaction can be adjusted using an electric field or chemical dopant, making graphene-based photonic devices tunable. (Applications such as)…fast photodetectors, optical modulators, far-infrared filters, polarizers, and electromagnetic wave shields. These graphene photonic devices could find various applications in optical communications, infrared imaging, and national security.

IBM Watson Research Center

 

Graphene is the thinnest known material in the universe and the strongest ever measured. Graphene can sustain current densities six orders of magnitude higher than that of copper…record thermal conductivity and stiffness, is impermeable to gases, and reconciles such conflicting qualities as brittleness and ductility.

Manchester

 

Recent discoveries have provided simple methods for preparing lab-scale samples to study graphene. A number of techniques have emerged that show promise for producing large-scale samples with the ultimate goal of developing devices that take advantage of graphene’s unusual properties. As large samples become available, the possibility grows for applications of this material in solar cell technology (as flexible, transparent electrodes), in composites material development, and in electronic devices.

Columbia

 

…those properties (of graphene/graphene oxides) can be exploited in several applications such as photo-catalysts (degradation of pollutants)…

Nokia Research

 

(We study) thermal transport properties of graphene…applications of controlling heat at nanoscale.

The thermal conductivity can be tuned dramatically by the graphene filler concentration.

Graphene-based composites are potentially promising as thermal interface materials (for) modern heat management in many industrial applications.

Purdue

 

The HVM Graphene 2013 Conference is co-located with the ARM sponsored Smart Homes & Cleanpower 2013 Conference, in its 8th year, which takes in Heat, Water and Connected devices/IoT Sessions for an excellent set of crossovers around energy, heat, storage, electronics, and data. Delegates of  one conference may move freely between both conference rooms for a rich, inspiring and productive experience on the day.

To attend HVM Graphene 2013, simply email (graphene@hvm-uk.com) with your name, affiliation & contact details, and the organisers will do the necessary (pricing is on the webpage linked above).

This blog entry was researched and compiled by Dr Justin Hayward MBA and Conference Director.

Smart Grids & Cleanpower 2013 – Cambridge conference gives global insights

A “cracking” day was had by over 100 senior delegates at the 5th Smart Grids & Cleanpower Conference Expo 2013 in Cambridge last week. Over 33% of the delegates took a survey & all spoke highly of the event. The conference was sponsored by local giant ARM Ltd.

Gold Sponsors Anglian Water and Hitachi Europe gave talks. In total there were nearly 40 speakers and moderators across the two streams. There were 7 panel sessions and 3 hours of networking and exhibition.

Pilgrim Beart, Founder Director of AlertMe Ltd, was voted the best speaker by over a third of delegates, giving a talk on Simplicity for the smart home, with Keith Clarke of ARM Ltd in second place with their vision of global connected intelligence.

Organiser and principal consultant at CIR Strategy Ltd Justin Hayward said: “Running a high quality conference of this size is immensely challenging. People are booking later and later, costs are rising, competition is growing as we move into the experience economy further. Yet this event, our 31st since 2002, was extremely rewarding on the day, as we achieved attendance over 100, and already over a third of the delegates have come back with uniformly high praise of the conference. As a consultancy, we continue to do interesting work around this general set of topics.”

Delegates have already been provided with a 50pp document PDF of all aspects of the day, edited by Justin Hayward PhD MBA and Michael McCreary CEng of CIR Strategy, from notes by Maria Gradillas of Imperial College. Delegates also have an image gallery of the day, speaker biographies & synopses, slides of all speakers, and a summary of the conference talks and panels (Chatham House).

 

Next year’s SGCP14 conference is already being built – see you on 4 June 2014. Upcoming conferences include the 5 November Smart Homes & Cleanpower Conference taking in the iWATER, iHEAT, and SHIFT sessions, co-located with the HVM Graphene Conference. Not a day to be missed!

You can sign up for the 5 November 2013 and 4 June 2014 conferences already here: http://www.cir-strategy.com/events/register

______________________________________________________

Smart Grids & Cleanpower: an overview of 5 June 2013

Dear colleague

SGCP 2013 is an exciting one-day conference expo in two streams for corporates, investors and entrepreneurs building businesses in the connected intelligence for grids and power sector. The conference is in its 5th year. We want to inform, inspire and connect the people and companies building & securing the smart grid and enabling safer cleaner lower-cost power generation.

Why attend SGCP – what this conference expo gives you

The double-stream conference brings together brands implementing connected intelligence and the disruptive tech companies supplying them to discuss smart grids “The Grid of Things” and transition energy security.

The Lead Sponsor is ARM. Speakers include ARM, Energy Saving Trust, Cyan Technology, BPAE, Anglian Water, National Grid, National Nuclear Lab, National Physical Lab, UK Power Networks, S&C tbc, Trilliant, ETI, DECC, Ofgem, Intellisense, Moixa Energy and AlertMe (see web for longer list andagenda).

Some who will be there: Cambridge University, Imperial College, Marshall Group, Anglian Water, Hitachi Europe Future Cities, Energy Saving Trust, NPL, TTP Ventures, Dawe Media, Fault Current Ltd, Maosco Ltd, Multos, Isentropic Ltd, AlertMe Ltd, Polysolar Ltd, Cambridge Carbon Capture Ltd, Green Tide Ltd, JKPM Ltd, Energence Ltd, Metric Digital, EDW Tech Ltd, Cyan Technology Ltd, Shirlaws, Trillion Fund, UKTI East, Alconbury Enterprise, Autodesk, Trilliant, S & C Electric, BPVA, KISS Comms Ltd, Quench Power Ltd, Venner Shipley LLP, Cambridge Design Partnership Ltd, The Guardian Newspaper, UK Power Networks, BP plc,National Grid, Ofgem, Intellisense, Buro Happold, Durham University, Electralink, NNL, Ofgem, Sainsbury’s plc, DECC, ETI, Solar Century plc, Renesola, Emblem Ventures, UKERC, Oxford University, Moixa Energy, Adapt Commercial Ltd, Poyry, Mansion Partners, Xsilon Ltd, PassivSystems, Nanoforce Ltd, Gazprom, Qatar Developments, greenBRIDGE, New Laws Legal, EDF Energy, Clean Capital Advisors, Low Carbon KEEP Programme, CreativeZones, FusionIP, Sentec, Cambashi.

Media Partners include Business Weekly, Cleantech Investor Magazine, Clean Capital Network, Connected Clusters, Cleantech Business News and Smart Grids Careers: a lot of publicity!

Using probably the best & most comfortable venue in Cambridge, we offer many hours of pleasant, great networking with a lunch as well as structured and unstructured sessions and Q&A throughout the day.

Interested in exhibiting?

There is still some space for showing off what you do in the conference networking hours including lunch so please do get in touch.

Rising stars in grids and power

A key part of the programme is showcasing with innovation pitches, hosted this year by experienced investor Clennell Collingwood of TTP Ventures, the best of the innovators that are making the connected intelligence, grid technology & power generation deployment. Companies with the greatest market potential will meet customers, investors and press. If you have a successful or new business in grids and power, take an expo showcase space here (only 2 spots remain).

You can find out more and register here (http://www.cir-strategy.com/events/register) for SGCP13 and/or HVM & iWATER November on the info webpage here.

By calling 01223 303500 to book and telling us that you heard about this through Cleantech Investor Magazine, we will give you a 20% discount from the exec and investor rates.

Justin Hayward

CIR Conferences in Cleantech and HVM

http://www.cir-strategy.com/events/cleanpower

Buy Tickets (http://www.cir-strategy.com/events/register)

Mobile: 44 7720 047 402

Email: justin@cantab.net

CIR Conferences on Twitter: @HVMConference

Skype: jhayward

LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/haywardcir

Slideshare: Past conference talks

More info about future events – speaking, sponsorship & registration

Conferences upcoming (call 01223 303500 to plan a great marketing programme):

Smart Grids & Cleanpower, 5 June, Cambridge

HVM Graphene Disruptive, 5 November, Cambridge

iWATER & iHEAT, 5 November, Cambridge

National Competencies & CIR Conferences 2013

The competencies of UK industry as identified by the top institute for manufacturing in the UK, the IfM, are covered by the conferences in HVM and Cleantech in 2013.

CIR is offering a passport for the year, which costs £520 and will enable access to 4 all-day high-quality conferences throughout the year, beginning with Smart Grids & Cleanpower on June 5 and going on to a water-based general Cleantech Conference iWATER & HVM Disruptive on November 5. The typical cost to attend a single conference is £325, and conferences of this type are attended for around £900/day in certain quarters in London, so that this year pass is great value.

In particular, energy generation, management and storage are covered at Smart Grids and Cleanpower, with the themes “Grid of Things” and “Transition Technologies” respectively.

Along with iWATER and HEAT & SHIFT later in the year on 5 November, these cleantech conferences cover business and market growth and the issues of scarcity of energy and other resources.

The second broad category competence mentioned by the IfM is that of competitiveness, efficiency and effective manufacturing systems. This broad area is covered on November 5 at HVM Disruptive – a follow-up to the successful 10th Anniversary HVM Conference in 2012. In particular, the role of government in industry is considered. But the main focus will be on disruptive technologies.

Sectors to be covered across the HVM conference are:

  • materials: composites and coatings (inks, adhesives etc)
  • nanoelectronics, photonics, devices, sensors,
  • energy & storage – as we saw
  • biotech applications

More agile methods, such as 3D/additive printing will be covered on November 5 in connection with the new material graphene. These along with the experience economy represent a whole paradigm shift for sustained growth in Western economies.

The whole area of “Smart” through “embedded, connected intelligence everywhere” is covered in the cleantech events on smart grids (June 5), industrial (clean)power generation (June 5), water tech for smart homes and factories (Nov 5).

Building new business models to realise superior value networks is a core competence of CIR Strategy, which organises this year’s series of HVM and cleantech conferences in the Golden Triangle of Cambridge, London and Oxford.

CIR espouses the understanding of value networks rather than supply chains and is expert in advising on these and in designing conferences to bring together the relevant stakeholders in a value network. The rigorous method behind much of this is called “Routes to Value”.

CIR believes that there is excellent growth to be obtained in Western, mature economies that are faltering and growing much more slowly than developing markets. This additional growth and value can be added through service design so that customers can buy and use products and services more easily, and in a more engaging way. This leads to the more developed experience economy. A series of experience services can be called a transformation. Transforming your clients is a goal that all businesses in the UK should be looking to achieve. Doing so would engender the kind of growth that we have seen elsewhere in the world over the last 10-20 years and make a great number of lives in the West and elsewhere better.

Therefore, all five strategic themes within the IfM report for the TSB in 2012 are covered by the HVM and Cleantech Conferences by CIR in 2013. A passport for just £520 can be obtained for executives seeking to go on this journey in 2013, building knowledge, connections and doing business.

CIR very much looks forward to seeing you at the conferences on June 5 and November 5, 2013.

You can sign up for a 2013 HVM and Cleantech passport up to 31 March 2013 by calling us at 01223 303500 or emailing events@cir-strategy.com. Or you can book directly for a specific conference here (buy tickets).